The Sunday Love List

I’m excited to share a new weekly series with you!  Each Sunday evening I’ll share a list of my favorite finds from around the web and beyond.

Picture via Instagram @ashtonhillfarms

  1. Cedar Rapids event center Ashton Hill Farms has me swooning!  I can’t wait to visit it. Look at all the natural light and high ceilings.  Who wouldn’t want to host an event there?

 

Via thinksplendid.com

2.  If you’re an innovator with big dreams and ideas, you should read this blog post by Liene Stevens of Think Splendid.  She’s a wedding industry consultant that I’ve had the pleasure of working with before. Even if you’re not a wedding professional but have big, new ideas you’re working on, I advise you to read this.  Liene’s unique background and research lead to some fascinating reads.

 

Photo via Mark & Graham

3. My southern girl radar went off immediately when I saw these acrylic coasters.  Tortoise shell & monograms?  I’ll take one for the win!

 

4.  Work gadget etiquette: A quick reminder and good pointers on how to use smartphones and other electronic devices at work.

 

5. Speaking of etiquette, did you catch my latest blog post in the summer etiquette series?  I talk about asking for leftovers.  Is it tacky or not?  Find out here.

 

Image via Pizzazzerie

6. How cute are these back-to-school teacher gifts from Pizzazerie? Click here to get the free printable and make your own!

See you next Sunday!

 

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Summer Etiquette Series: Can I ask for leftovers?

I’m back with the summer etiquette series and today I’m tackling a situation I’ve run into many time over my years in the hospitality industry; is it okay to ask for leftovers at a cookout?

As a hospitality management major I started my hospitality career as a server for banquets before becoming a catering assistant, a catering manager at a college and eventually owning my own catering business. I cannot count the number of times a guest has come to me and asked, “can I take a plate to go?”  In the beginning it was the little old ladies who dared to even bring their own aluminum foil but then it became just about any guest who enjoyed the meal or didn’t want to make lunch the next day.

So is it okay to ask for or expect leftovers when attending an event?  You should follow the lead of the host or hostess.  If the hostess offers leftovers then by all means, take advantage of the offer if you’d like.  If there is no offer, consider that there could be a number of reasons why one wasn’t extended. You should not attend a party with the expectation of taking home tomorrow’s lunch. I’ve also seen guest ask to take plates home for relatives who didn’t attend and this is not okay especially if the relative was invited and didn’t attend.  It is not the hostess’ job to feed them.

As a hostess I’m always obliged to give a guest a to-go if they ask since it’s my job is to be gracious and accommodating whenever possible. However, there have been times when I did that at the detriment of my plans for the leftovers.  If you are not inclined to be overly gracious as a host, it is perfectly okay to thank the guest for their compliment and politely decline the request because you already have plans for the food.

The goal is considering the feelings of others.  In most cases the host would LOVE to unload extra food so they don’t have to store them or eventually throw them away.  BUT, if they don’t offer, do your best not to ask and put them in an uncomfortable situation and for goodness sake, please don’t ever attend a dinner with your aluminum foil and bowls in tow!

 

Kindly,

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What are your event colors saying?

color-meaningsThe colors you use when hosting your event can say a lot about not only the event but who you are as a person. Should your guest come expecting a lively, exciting party, a sophisticated and passionate event or a calm and relaxing, vintage-inspired affair?  The tone of your event is set with each component of the event starting with any  correspondence you send and the colors you use.

Today I want to delve into what the colors you use for your event say about you and your event. It’s sometimes thought that a person’s choice of colors for their event tends to be a subconscious reflection of their personality. Today let’s take a look at the colors red and yellow.

RED– The color red is a strong, energetic color that evokes passion, energy, and demands attention. Events that feature red are usually those where the hosts want to make a bold statement.  Red can be very versatile, though, with brighter versions being more energetic and darker shades being more powerful and elegant.red wedding

Keep in mind that red can mean different things to different people.  Outside the western world, red has different associations. For example, in China, red is the color of prosperity and happiness. It can also be used to attract good luck. In other eastern cultures, red is worn by brides on their wedding days. In South Africa, however, red is the color of mourning.

If you’re looking to use red as a main color in your event, what you pair it with can  contribute to creating a cohesive look that expresses who you are and what you want your guests to feel while attending your event.

Red flowers symbolize courage, respect, constancy, admiration and,  desire.

Red events, especially in weddings create a warm and stimulation moodRed is energizing. It excites the emotions and can evoke feelings of passion and excitement. But beware….The color red can stimulate the appetite, often being used in restaurants for this purpose.  You might make some of your guests REALLY hungry!

YELLOW– like the sun, denotes positivity and optimism. A yellow event brings joy and happiness to your guests

yellow eventExuding warmth and vitality and usually possessing a great sense of humor, people who love yellow are usually cheerful and optimistic. They tend to look forward to the future and are intellectual, creative and idealistic.

A yellow event creates a warm, welcoming, cheerful and happy mood which can often lift up the spirits of your guests.  You’ll often find yellow being used for events that celebrate new beginnings like baby showers.

Variations of yellow include; citrine, golden (lemon) yellow, cream and a darker, deeper yellow.

Yellow events tend to yell “let’s have some fun and be happy!” while Yellow flowers represent trust, compassion, respect, sympathy and warmth.

What about you?  What feelings or thoughts to the colors red and yellow evoke for you?